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Lancaster, PA 17602
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Home » Your Eye Health » Eye Conditions » Retinitis Pigmentosa

Retinitis Pigmentosa

Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an eye disease that is inherited, and very rare. About one in four thousand Americans are affected by this disease. The retina, which is the light-sensitive portion of the eye, degenerates progressively over time. The result of this degeneration is the loss of peripheral vision, loss of central vision, night blindness, and sometimes blindness.

Retinitis Pigmentosa Symptoms

Childhood is when the first symptoms of retinitis pigmentosa generally appear. Usually both eyes are implicated in the disease. Sometimes RP doesn’t appear until older age, at age 30 or even older.

The main symptom of RP in the beginning stages is night blindness. Tunnel vision may develop in the later stages of the disease, where central vision is affected, and only a small portion of sight is available.

One study of patients suffering from RP revealed that, in patients 45 years and older, 52% had at least 20/40 central vision in one eye, 25% had 20/200 vision or below, and 0.5% were completely blind.

Causes of Retinitis Pigmentosa

Very little is known about the causes behind RP, beyond that it is an inherited disease. Scientists believe that defective molecules in our genes cause RP. This explains why the disease affects patients so differently.

If one parent carries the defective gene, it’s possible to get RP, even if your parents do not have the disease. Approximately one percent of the population are carriers of the RP recessive gene. Sometimes this recessive gene is passed on to the child, who will then develop retinitis pigmentosa.

RP affects the retina in the eye. The disease causes the light-sensitive cells that are located in the retina to die gradually. Most often, the cells that are used for night and peripheral vision, called rod cells, are affected. Sometimes the cells that are used to see color and for central vision, called cones, are also affected.

Diagnosis and Treatment

The main diagnostic tool employed is visual field testing. This test determines how much peripheral vision loss has occurred. Other diagnostic tools may be used to test night vision and color vision.

Few treatments exist for RP. What is available helps conditions associated with RP, not the disease itself. For patients older than 25, there is a prosthesis system that was recently approved. This system captures images via glasses, and transmits the signal captures to an implanted device located on the retina.

Most treatments center around helping the patient learn to deal with their vision loss. Psychological counseling, and occupational therapy, may be recommended. Technological instruments that help with low vision, such as illuminated magnifiers, can help patients with RP see as well as possible with their limited vision. Some doctors recommend vitamin A supplements as there is some evidence that vitamin A might help delay the progression of the disease.

For the future, scientists are hopeful that there will be additional treatments for RP, including new drug treatments and retinal implants.

Dear Patients,

We will be reopening our office Monday, May 18, 2020, and would like to bring you up to date with the many very important physical and procedural changes we have made to our office to assure the highest level of health and safety for our patients and staff during these very challenging times.

We have consulted with our county, state and federal officials, as well as the CDC and other healthcare professionals, to incorporate the recommended and required safety measures throughout our office.

We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience we may have caused by rescheduling or postponing your earlier appointments.

To assure the health and safety of our staff and patients, as well as minimize any exposure, we have instituted the following changes. Please read through this entire document and print a copy so you are familiar with them.

1. Any and ALL appointments and visits will need to be scheduled. This includes the pickup of eyeglasses or trial contact lenses, frame selection, eyeglass repairs, and eyeglass adjustments.

2. Contact lenses will be shipped to all patients at no charge

3. To maintain social distancing and minimize any possible exposure, we have spread out our patient schedule.

4. 24-48 hours before your appointment, one of our staff will be calling to remind you of your appointment and discuss your ocular and medical history. In addition, they will ask you standard COVID19 screening questions and answer any questions regarding your upcoming exam. This will take 5 – 10 minutes but this initial call is important to allow you ample time in our office.

Please look for and answer this call.

5. In order to save time and keep everyone on schedule, any and all medications you are taking should be listed in as much detail as possible on a separate piece of paper, emailed to our secure site: DROXENBERG@COMCAST.NET, or entered on the patient registration form on our website: WWW.DROXENBERG.COM. This needs to be completed prior to your appointment and should include all systemic medications (diabetes, hypertension, etc.) and ocular medications (eye drops, glaucoma medicine, etc.).

6. On the day of your appointment please plan to arrive 15 minutes early and call us at (717) 394-3798 when you arrive. We will return your call when you will be allowed to enter. Entry will be through the front door only unless previously discussed with our staff. Only the person with the appointment will be allowed in the office with the exception of minor children who have the appointment. NOTE: Family members and/or friends will need to wait outside.

7. We will be taking your temperature in the vestibule and anyone with a temperature of 100 degrees or higher or who is sick will be rescheduled. If you feel ill, please reschedule your appointment.

8. All staff will have their temperatures checked 2 times daily for your safety.

9. All staff will wear a facemask while in the office. In addition, all patients must wear a facemask while in the office as mandated by Governor Wolf for all PA businesses. If you do not wear a facemask, one will be provided to you.

10. There are hand sanitizing stations strategically placed throughout the office. Please use them.

11. All frames will be disinfected before and after being handled by patients and staff. Frames will not be returned to the frame display until they are appropriately disinfected.

12. All exam room equipment will be cleaned and disinfected before and after each use according to the CDC guidelines.

13. Cleaning and disinfection of our office have always been a priority and this will continue in earnest.

14. Preferred payment is by credit card or checks at the time of services but cash will be accepted.

15. We have installed a plexiglass barrier on our front desk to comply with the CDC and state guidance.

16. Reception area chairs have been separated to maintain social distancing.

17. Patients who are physically disabled will be allowed entry through the rear door, with prior approval, following a temperature check and COVID19 screening. All other patients must enter through the front door and screening vestibule.

18. Above all else, your safety and health are our top priorities. We take this responsibility very seriously and have implemented these changes in procedures to achieve this.

Dr. Oxenberg has been providing eye care to you and your family since 1990 and expects to continue for many years to come.

If you have any questions and /or concerns, please feel free to email our office at droxenberg@comcast.net or call (717) 394-3798.

We look forward to seeing you all again!

Sincerely,

Dr. Larry Oxenberg