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Home » Your Eye Health » Contact Lens Basics

Contact Lens Basics

If you need vision correction for nearsightedness, farsightedness or astigmatism, contact lenses are a popular and effective option. In the United States, approximately 20% of the population who requires vision correction wears contact lenses. Currently dating back more than 125 years, contacts are presently available in a wide variety of materials and types. As opposed to the situation years ago, nowadays almost everyone can wear contact lenses.

Eyeglasses may be an attractive way to accessorize your outfit and make a fashion statement, yet you may sometimes prefer your appearance without glasses. Contact lenses allow you to have sharp vision without eyeglasses or costly vision surgery. Another benefit of contacts is that they grant a wider field of vision than glasses. This is a major advantage when it comes to playing sports or engaging in hobbies and professions such as photography.

If you are considering wearing contact lenses, you’ll need to schedule an initial eye exam and contact lens evaluation with your eye doctor. In the United States, contacts are regarded as medical devices that require a prescription by an eye care professional (ECP). In order to determine the best lenses for you, your ECP will assess your visual condition, structure of your eye and natural tear production.

Contact lenses are categorized depending upon the following factors:

  1. Material composition
  2. How long they can be worn before you have to take them out
  3. Life span- how long they can be used before you have to toss them and grab a new pair
  4. Design of the lenses

Material Composition of Contact Lenses

There are four different types of contact lens materials:

Soft Lenses

Over 90% of contact lenses on the market today are classified as soft lenses. These ultra-comfortable, thin contacts are constructed from gel-like plastics that contain a high percentage of water. They cover the entire cornea of your eye (clear front surface) and it is typically easy to adapt to wearing them.

First introduced in 1971, soft lenses used to be made from hydrogel materials. At present, silicone hydrogel is the most widespread, popular version. They permit a higher quantity of oxygen to reach the eye, which is healthy and comfortable.

Hard, Gas Permeable Lenses

Also called GP or RGP (rigid gas permeable) lenses, these contacts are smaller and made from plastics that have no water. They often provide the advantage of more acute vision, yet it generally takes longer to adapt to wearing them.

Hybrid Lenses

The center zone of these lenses is made from rigid gas permeable lenses, and a soft lens material encircles the border. Hybrid lenses thereby provide the best of both worlds – sharp vision from the center and a soft, comfortable border.

Wearing Time for Contact Lenses

The two primary kinds of contact lenses are daily wear and extended wear. Daily wear lenses must be removed on a nightly basis, and extended wear lenses may be worn up to seven days; a few brands of extended wear lenses are approved by the FDA for monthly wear (also known as “continuous wear” lenses). Extended wear lenses are very convenient even if you always remove them before going to sleep, as they are safe and comfortable for napping. Don’t sleep in your lenses unless you’ve discussed this with your doctor, since improper wear times can lead to corneal damage.

Life Span for Contact Lenses

All contact lenses must be discarded after a specified amount of time, even if you care for them well and properly. Soft contact lenses in particular accumulate lens deposits and contamination, which raises your risk of eye infections.

  • Daily disposable lenses: the most convenient and healthiest option, these lenses are replaced after one day of wear
  • Overnight disposable lenses (kept in your eyes overnight): must be replaced after one week
  • Monthly wear lenses: these are discarded after wearing for 30 days.
  • Gas permeable contact lenses: these are more resistant to lens deposits and can last up to a year or in many cases even longer with excellent care.

Designs for Contact Lenses

Contact lenses vary depending upon the type of vision correction that is required. The most common design is spherical, which works for nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism. Toric lenses, which come in both soft and GP versions, possess multiple lens powers to correct astigmatism. Bifocal and multifocal lenses utilize a number of zones for different viewing needs, such as near, intermediate and far vision. They are often a good option for presbyopia. Orthokeratology (ortho-k) lenses are designed to reshape the cornea overnight, which corrects daytime vision without a need for eyeglasses or lenses.

Additional Features of Contact Lenses

Colored contacts: Lenses can be worn in color tints that enhance the natural color of your eyes or change your eye color totally. Blue eyes can be made more vibrant, or brown eyes can be altered to green.

Special-effect contacts: These lenses offer an extreme change to the color of your eyes and are generally used for costumes or theatrical effects. You can look like a zombie, an animal, or whatever you envision!

Prosthetic contacts: Disfigurations caused by disease or accidents can be masked by these colored contact lenses. With a medical orientation, prosthetic lenses are generally used to match the appearance of both eyes.

Contact Lenses that are Right for You

To identify the lenses that are ideal for your needs, you must first have a complete eye examination and contact lens evaluation performed by your eye doctor. Your ocular health will be inspected and detailed measurements of your eyes will be taken. Trial lenses will be inserted to check for the best possible and most comfortable fit and vision

After your initial fitting, follow-up visits for contact lenses are important. Your eye doctor will check that the fit is right and that no complications are developing. Your tolerance to contact lenses will be assessed. Sometimes a change in the fit or type of lens is necessary.

Your contact lens prescription will be issued after the fitting process is complete.

Proper Care and Handling of Contact Lenses

It is relatively simple to care for contact lenses. A single, multi-purpose lens solution is generally all that’s required for cleaning, disinfecting and storing your lenses. With daily disposables, routine care is totally eliminated and you can enjoy the feeling of a brand new fresh clean lens every day.

Your eye doctor or contact lens technician will instruct you how to take care of your contact lenses before you leave the office.

Dear Patients,

We will be reopening our office Monday, May 18, 2020, and would like to bring you up to date with the many very important physical and procedural changes we have made to our office to assure the highest level of health and safety for our patients and staff during these very challenging times.

We have consulted with our county, state and federal officials, as well as the CDC and other healthcare professionals, to incorporate the recommended and required safety measures throughout our office.

We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience we may have caused by rescheduling or postponing your earlier appointments.

To assure the health and safety of our staff and patients, as well as minimize any exposure, we have instituted the following changes. Please read through this entire document and print a copy so you are familiar with them.

1. Any and ALL appointments and visits will need to be scheduled. This includes the pickup of eyeglasses or trial contact lenses, frame selection, eyeglass repairs, and eyeglass adjustments.

2. Contact lenses will be shipped to all patients at no charge

3. To maintain social distancing and minimize any possible exposure, we have spread out our patient schedule.

4. 24-48 hours before your appointment, one of our staff will be calling to remind you of your appointment and discuss your ocular and medical history. In addition, they will ask you standard COVID19 screening questions and answer any questions regarding your upcoming exam. This will take 5 – 10 minutes but this initial call is important to allow you ample time in our office.

Please look for and answer this call.

5. In order to save time and keep everyone on schedule, any and all medications you are taking should be listed in as much detail as possible on a separate piece of paper, emailed to our secure site: DROXENBERG@COMCAST.NET, or entered on the patient registration form on our website: WWW.DROXENBERG.COM. This needs to be completed prior to your appointment and should include all systemic medications (diabetes, hypertension, etc.) and ocular medications (eye drops, glaucoma medicine, etc.).

6. On the day of your appointment please plan to arrive 15 minutes early and call us at (717) 394-3798 when you arrive. We will return your call when you will be allowed to enter. Entry will be through the front door only unless previously discussed with our staff. Only the person with the appointment will be allowed in the office with the exception of minor children who have the appointment. NOTE: Family members and/or friends will need to wait outside.

7. We will be taking your temperature in the vestibule and anyone with a temperature of 100 degrees or higher or who is sick will be rescheduled. If you feel ill, please reschedule your appointment.

8. All staff will have their temperatures checked 2 times daily for your safety.

9. All staff will wear a facemask while in the office. In addition, all patients must wear a facemask while in the office as mandated by Governor Wolf for all PA businesses. If you do not wear a facemask, one will be provided to you.

10. There are hand sanitizing stations strategically placed throughout the office. Please use them.

11. All frames will be disinfected before and after being handled by patients and staff. Frames will not be returned to the frame display until they are appropriately disinfected.

12. All exam room equipment will be cleaned and disinfected before and after each use according to the CDC guidelines.

13. Cleaning and disinfection of our office have always been a priority and this will continue in earnest.

14. Preferred payment is by credit card or checks at the time of services but cash will be accepted.

15. We have installed a plexiglass barrier on our front desk to comply with the CDC and state guidance.

16. Reception area chairs have been separated to maintain social distancing.

17. Patients who are physically disabled will be allowed entry through the rear door, with prior approval, following a temperature check and COVID19 screening. All other patients must enter through the front door and screening vestibule.

18. Above all else, your safety and health are our top priorities. We take this responsibility very seriously and have implemented these changes in procedures to achieve this.

Dr. Oxenberg has been providing eye care to you and your family since 1990 and expects to continue for many years to come.

If you have any questions and /or concerns, please feel free to email our office at droxenberg@comcast.net or call (717) 394-3798.

We look forward to seeing you all again!

Sincerely,

Dr. Larry Oxenberg